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Halibut with Clementine Gremolata

Halibut with Clementine Gremolata



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Ingredients

Gremolata

  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled, minced
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Fish

  • 4 6-ounce halibut fillets
  • Extra-virgin olive oil (for drizzling)

Recipe Preparation

Gremolata

  • Using vegetable peeler, remove peel (orange part only) of clementines. Chop peel (reserve flesh for another use). Combine chopped clementine peel, chopped parsley, minced garlic, and sea salt in small bowl. Stir in extra-virgin olive oil and set gremolata aside. DO AHEAD Gremolata can be prepared 4 hours ahead. Cover and refrigerate.

Fish

  • Preheat oven to 350°F. Using vegetable peeler, remove peel of clementine in four 2-inch-long strips (orange part only). Cut four 12-inch squares parchment paper. Place halibut fillet in center of each parchment paper square. Sprinkle with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Drizzle halibut lightly with olive oil. Place 1 clementine peel strip, cut side up, on each halibut fillet. Bring 2 edges of parchment paper together along long side of fish fillet and fold parchment edges together 3 to 4 times. Tuck both remaining edges of parchment underneath fillet to create packet and place parchment packet on rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with remaining fish fillets. DO AHEAD Halibut packets can be made 4 hours ahead. Chill on rimmed baking sheet.

  • Bake fish just until opaque in center, about 18 minutes (to check doneness, unwrap packet and insert fork in fillet). Remove rimmed baking sheet from oven. Unwrap fish. Place halibut fillets on plates, spoon gremolata over, and serve.

Nutritional Content

One serving contains the following: Calories (kcal) 351.9 %Calories from Fat 46.2 Fat (g) 18.1 Saturated Fat (g) 2.5 Cholesterol (mg) 54.4 Carbohydrates (g) 9.7 Dietary Fiber (g) 1.5 Total Sugars (g) 6.9 Net Carbs (g) 8.3 Protein (g) 36.3Reviews Section

Cauliflower “Steaks”

I have to be honest here, I am not a huge fan of cauliflower. I grew up eating it raw on the veggie tray smothered in ranch dressing or cooked and covered in gooey cheese sauce. Sound familiar?

Because I know the value of adding a variety of vegetables to your palate, I am always looking for ways to cook cauliflower that my family will enjoy without the calorie dense sauces. Here is a recipe that accomplishes just that! It even has a fancy name to impress your friends. Give it a go.

Grilled Cauliflower Steaks with Lemon-lime Feta Gremolata

recipe by The Food Network modified by eatlivefit.net

prep/cook time: 30 minutes serves 6

Ingredients

2 small heads of cauliflower

1 cup fresh cilantro leaves

2 Tbs feta cheese crumbled

Pinch of sea salt and pepper

1 Tbs Olive Oil (or grapeseed oil)

Directions

Heat the grill to medium high heat.

Trim off and discard the cauliflower leaves. Flip each head over so the stem side is facing up. Trim about 1/4 inch from the bottom of the stem, then cut each head into 3 thick slabs. Reserve side florets that fall away when trimmed for later use.

In a medium bowl, grate the garlic clove. Grate the zest of the lime and 1 lemon, the juice the lime and 1/2 the lemon into the same bowl. Finely chop the cilantro and reserved cauliflower bits. Add the feta cheese to the bowl and stir to mix. Season with pinch of salt and pepper.

In separate small bowl, whisk together remaining juice from other 1/2 of lemon and oil. Brush one side of each cauliflower slice with this mixture, then place on preheated grill, oiled side down. Cook for 4 minutes, brush with oil/lemon mixture on the top and flip to cook for an additional 4-5 minutes on the other side. Continue to cook until slightly charred and tender (approx. 3 minutes depending on thickness of slices).

Slice remaining lemon into wedges. Spoon the cooked slices of cauliflower, “steaks”, with a Tbs of garlic, feta, cilantro mix and serve with lemon wedge on side.


feta, pickled red onion, mixed greens, yellow pepper vinaigrette

anchovy vinaigrette, garlic bread crumbs

fennel, grapes, radish, blue cheese, creamy lemon dressing

bacon, red onion, avocado, egg, blue cheese, house ranch

with chicken $ 23

with shrimp $ 28

with salmon $ 32

with hanger $ 34

American cheese, red onion, dill pickles, special sauce, brioche bun, french fries

marinated eggplant, avocado, smoked mozzarella, french fries

provolone, horseradish, giardiniera, sourdough, french fries

rosemary potatoes, red wine demi-glace

sautéed spinach, lemon-almond butter

panko, parmesan, tomato, mozzarella


Cauliflower “Steaks”

I have to be honest here, I am not a huge fan of cauliflower. I grew up eating it raw on the veggie tray smothered in ranch dressing or cooked and covered in gooey cheese sauce. Sound familiar?

Because I know the value of adding a variety of vegetables to your palate, I am always looking for ways to cook cauliflower that my family will enjoy without the calorie dense sauces. Here is a recipe that accomplishes just that! It even has a fancy name to impress your friends. Give it a go.

Grilled Cauliflower Steaks with Lemon-lime Feta Gremolata

recipe by The Food Network modified by eatlivefit.net

prep/cook time: 30 minutes serves 6

Ingredients

2 small heads of cauliflower

1 cup fresh cilantro leaves

2 Tbs feta cheese crumbled

Pinch of sea salt and pepper

1 Tbs Olive Oil (or grapeseed oil)

Directions

Heat the grill to medium high heat.

Trim off and discard the cauliflower leaves. Flip each head over so the stem side is facing up. Trim about 1/4 inch from the bottom of the stem, then cut each head into 3 thick slabs. Reserve side florets that fall away when trimmed for later use.

In a medium bowl, grate the garlic clove. Grate the zest of the lime and 1 lemon, the juice the lime and 1/2 the lemon into the same bowl. Finely chop the cilantro and reserved cauliflower bits. Add the feta cheese to the bowl and stir to mix. Season with pinch of salt and pepper.

In separate small bowl, whisk together remaining juice from other 1/2 of lemon and oil. Brush one side of each cauliflower slice with this mixture, then place on preheated grill, oiled side down. Cook for 4 minutes, brush with oil/lemon mixture on the top and flip to cook for an additional 4-5 minutes on the other side. Continue to cook until slightly charred and tender (approx. 3 minutes depending on thickness of slices).

Slice remaining lemon into wedges. Spoon the cooked slices of cauliflower, “steaks”, with a Tbs of garlic, feta, cilantro mix and serve with lemon wedge on side.


Balzac&rsquos

Toronto Coffee Roasters, Balzac&rsquos is offering a locally-sourced gift bundle launched.

In support of small businesses and artists across Ontario, the bundle includes a Balzac&rsquos Coffee blend of choice with a retro mug, in addition to a Biggins Collection trinket tray by Toronto artist Kate Golding, and a Mother&rsquos Day card with hand-drawn illustrations from local card shop, Gotamago.

Balzac&rsquos is offering free contactless delivery on orders over $50, with same-day delivery in the GTA if ordered before 12 p.m. EST until Friday.

Wayspa

WaySpa is Canada&rsquos largest spa and wellness marketplace with over 2,000 partner spas.

They have a Mother&rsquos Day deal of 10% off your gift certificate order of $50 or more. Use this link (affiliate) for the deal.


Sally Clarke: my 30 favourite ingredients

Pride of her alley: Sally Clarke at her elegant shop, deli and restaurant in Kensington, west London. She delights in using fresh, seasonal ingredients, 30 of which are featured in her new book Credit: ANDREW CROWLEY

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S ally Clarke is not afraid to speak her mind. The chef is so evangelical about eating according to the seasons that when our photographer asks her to pose with piles of fruit and vegetables, she refuses to be snapped with any produce not available in autumn. “Anything used out of season gets my hackles up,” she says sternly, as I sheepishly nudge apricots and tomatoes to one side. “To see asparagus on a menu in November is depressing, because you know it hasn’t come from Norfolk or Cambridgeshire. It must have been shipped from somewhere in the southern hemisphere, and it can’t taste of that freshness, that peak of brightness. It loses its specialness.”

Clarke has always been a quiet revolutionary. When she opened her London restaurant, Clarke’s, in 1984, her diners had no choice what they ate: she simply served them a four-course menu based on whatever had caught her eye at the market that morning. “I had some rather snooty Kensington people saying,” – she mimics an upper-class accent – “ 'Where’s the real menu?’ But I wanted to present a menu that was perfect for that day. If it was 90 degrees in the shade outside, I wanted a beautiful chilled salad on a plate that had come out of the fridge. If it was a winter’s day, we’d put something warming and comforting and stew-ish on the table. The menu would still be being tweaked and refined almost until we unlocked the doors for dinner service.”

Just as radical for the time was her open kitchen. “I had people say, 'But, I never eat in the kitchen at home, so why would I eat in the kitchen when I go out for dinner?’ But little by little, more and more people wanted to see what was going on, and they chose the tables opposite the kitchen.” Before long, Clarke’s was one of the hottest tables in town, with starry names such as Lucian Freud and Emma Thompson regularly popping in. It is not an exaggeration to say that her style – high-quality ingredients, often locally sourced, cooked elegantly and simply – is now the norm.

Today, Clarke is still very much at the heart of her restaurant. Unlike many chefs, she is not just a name above the door. When I arrive to discuss her new book, 30 Ingredients – which is a celebration of both 30 years of the restaurant and her 30 favourite foods to cook with – she is clad in chef whites and an apron, and still glowing with pleasure at the halibut ceviche she served for lunch. (“The halibut was too good. I was prepping it and I got halfway through, and thought, this beautiful half fillet, we’ve got to serve it raw.”) No surprise, then, that she doesn’t exactly churn out the cookbooks. Her first was published more than a decade ago, and it took her eight years to finish this one. It was, she confesses, originally intended to mark 25 years, but “I sort of ran out of time and then lost the plot…”

Each recipe is based on one of her 30 key ingredients. They are predominantly vegetarian, though this wasn’t intentional: “It just turned out that all my favourite ingredients are fruits, salads, herbs and nuts, with meats taking a secondary role.” Among the stars are cherries, broad beans, leeks and figs, though there are a few more unusual suspects. Cobnuts, those tender nuts from Kent that arrive in early September, feature. So does a little-known leaf called landcress, about which Clarke waxes lyrical: “It is probably my favourite salad. It’s a lot more peppery than watercress. It’s got that sort of sharp kick that cuts the richness of the other ingredients.” Did she struggle to identify the 30 she wanted to feature? She shakes her head. “But there are so many others that I could have included.”

It was a few years ago that Clarke made the decision to widen the restaurant’s offering beyond her set menu. “I felt that being very rigid had made us a little bit of a special occasion restaurant,” she explains. “I wanted it to become more of a relaxed place where people could just come in and have a bowl of risotto and a lovely glass of wine.” She places a heavy emphasis on hospitality, or what she dubs “the art of the table”, and says she takes as much pleasure in greeting and seating guests as she does cooking. Throughout our interview, she breaks off constantly to wave off diners, and asks me if I want to be fed more times than my mother when I’m home for Christmas.

Clarke and her husband, John Morton Morris, an art dealer, live in Chelsea, though she would rather keep her private life just that – private. In her free time, though, she reveals that she likes to eat in other people’s restaurants, especially the River Café in west London, which she admires for its “ability to transport diners to the heart of Italy by just walking through the front door”, and is a regular at the Royal Opera House. She works hard, often leaving at midnight, except when her 16-year-old son Samuel is back from boarding school. “While he’s there, I work 24/7. When he’s out of school, I’m with him.”

Clarke’s love of food began in childhood. She grew up in Surrey, the daughter of an auctioneer father and a mother who “was more interested in the garden than in the kitchen”. There was a set of well-thumbed cookbooks from Elizabeth David in the house, which Clarke “read like novels”. When her mother told her what fruit and vegetables they had that day, she simply picked a recipe and pulled on her apron. She also had a special school friend called Candy. “Her mother and father had the most wonderful house with the most wonderful kitchen. Candy and I would be left to our own devices with biscuit and cake recipes. We had so much fun doing that, laughing and giggling, and then, of course, eating the results.”

After leaving school, Clarke studied catering at Croydon Technical College, then jetted off to Paris to study at Le Cordon Bleu cookery school to gain a little French finesse. She was disappointed to realise that she already had most of the skills, but being in Paris was thrilling to a young woman embarking on a love affair with food: “I could look through restaurant windows and read their menus and walk through street markets and look at bakeries and see the beautiful apricot tarts in the windows with crusty edges. I just fell in love with the whole thing.”

It was some years later that she discovered the kind of food she wanted to cook. A friend in California called her out of the blue and invited her to join him at his new restaurant. During the day, she worked in the kitchen and at night, waited at table. “It was a baptism of fire. I really knew nothing about restaurant service, and I think I was very slow. Why they put up with me I have no idea,” she says self-deprecatingly.

But West Coast cuisine blew her away, particularly the food of Alice Waters, of the celebrated “farm to table” restaurant Chez Panisse in Berkeley (now godmother to Clarke’s son). “It was the freshness of the ingredients. The food leapt off the plates with colour and vitality. Californian cuisine was fresh, vibrant flavours: grilled fish and meats, relishes made with mangoes and limes and coriander, wonderful fresh broccoli and spinach leaves. It was a picture on a plate.”

After five years, it was time for Clarke to open her own restaurant. But she had realised that her “soul was an English girl”, so she moved back to London to find a site, and the rest is culinary history. As well as the restaurant, she now has a bakery and deli across the road, and supplies bread and other goods to 120 clients, including Harrods, the House of Commons and Eurostar (if you’ve ever munched on a croissant on your way to Paris, it was made by Clarke’s team).

The food has shifted too. When she started, “half my heart was in California”, and the dishes reflected that. Now, she sees herself as “firmly in a Mediterranean zone, which incorporates the best of California with the best of British produce”. She loves Indian cuisine, and admires Yotam Ottolenghi’s bold Middle Eastern flavours, but is rarely tempted to incorporate more exotic touches into her menu. “Elizabeth David is sitting on my shoulder day in day out, as is Alice Waters on my other shoulder,” she says.

What would her desert island meal be? Her answer (no surprises here) is whatever is in season, although she concedes that her idea of heaven is “a crab salad, and then a very simply roasted chicken”. When I tell her that chefs nearly always say roast chicken, she laughs. “There are clever people like Heston doing amazing things, but at the end of the day, I’m sure he and Gordon Ramsay and Angela Hartnett would just love something pure and simple,” she says, earnestly. “And if it’s a great chicken, roasted with herbs and great olive oil, then what could be better?” Amen to that.

Sally Clarke: 30 Ingredients (Frances Lincoln, £25), is available from Telegraph Books


KNOW YOUR SEAFOOD from Jensen Bros. Seafood in Dunedin, Florida 'Great Seafood Since 1984'

Amberjack: Florida Amberjack has darker meat and high oil content. It has a great flavor when broiled or grilled. Cooks up white and flakes well.

Bass, Chilean Sea: Chilean Sea Bass is caught off the coast of South America. Due to high oil content, it's excellent when grilling, baking or broiling. Chilean Sea Bass, a snow white fillet, has large flakes, is tender, moist and has a mild flavor.

Catfish &ndash "farmed" in Mississippi. This fish is white, flakey, and mild. It is great fried, grilled or baked.

Cobia: Bears a striking resemblance to a shark. It's texture is soft and moist with a nice white flake. It can be served fried, poached or pan sauté. Excellent and delicious!

Cod, Atlantic: Caught off the coast of Iceland and flown by jet to the U.S., Atlantic Cod is lean, has flaky texture with a mild delicate flavor.

Corvina: Caught off the Pacific coast of South American, Corvina is a mild flavored and firm textured fish. Taste like a cross between Mahi and Snapper. A Latin favorite!

Flounder: Flounder fillets are thin and small with a milky color that cooks up white. The mild delicate taste of Flounder is sweet and has a delicate texture with small flakes. Sauté, poach or stuff.

Grouper, Red: The domestic species caught off the coast of Florida is white and lean with a mild sweet flavor. Red Grouper meat is firm with a heavy flake and remains moist after cooking. Make the famous Fried Grouper sandwich!

Haddock, Atlantic: Caught off the coast of Iceland and flown to the U.S., Atlantic Haddock has a lean white meat. The meat cooks up very white and has a delicate and slightly sweet taste. The texture is firm, tender and has a finer flake than Cod. Fillets are skin-on.

Halibut: Halibut meat is firm and very white. It has a mild taste and is very lean. This fish can be cooked in any manner, but when over cooked, it can easily dry out.

Mahi-Mahi: This tropical fish is very popular. The raw meat is pinkish to off white in color and has a mild taste similar to tuna or swordfish. The meat has a finer texture and large flakes. Grill, fry or bake.

Monk Fish: The tail of the Monk Fish is the only part used. Known as "Poor Man's Lobster". The tail is firm, dense and boneless. It has a mild sweet flavor and cooks up white in color. Bake or grill and serve with melted butter for dipping.

Mississippi Catfish farmed in Mississippi. Catfish is flaky and has a mild flavor. Great grilled with seasoning, panfried, or battered and deep fried.

Mountain Trout: farmed in the mountains of Andrews, NC, packed in ice and shipped fresh to us. North Carolina trout is flaky and has a mild delicate flavor. Serve with lemon, butter and parsely. Pan sauté or grill.

Salmon, Atlantic: Farm-raised Salmon has a flesh color that can range from red to orange, but cooks up a light red. Salmon flavor is mild to taste, slightly oily, but moist with large flakes.

Snapper, Red: The raw meat of Red Snapper is white with a pinkish tinge and always has the red color skin. Red Snapper is mildly sweet with a lean, firm moist texture. Fillets are skin-on.

Swordfish: This prized fish has a flesh color that will vary from pink, white, gray, orange with diet. Beige when cooked, Swordfish steaks are lean, slightly sweet and firm. Grill swordfish.

Tilapia: A farm-raised fresh water fish, Tilapia fillets are white with a pinkish tinge. Similar to Snapper or Flounder, the flavor is mild and distinctive. The texture is lean, firm and moist.

Wahoo: One of the fastest swimming fish, Wahoo, called Ono in Hawaii, fillets are long and slender. Off-white to pinkish in color, Wahoo cooks up very white and has a firm, lean, distinctive flesh. Do not over-cook!


Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s Kitchen Season 16 Updates: Meet the Contestants

Fans are sure to be anxious for updates on Season 16 of Hell’s Kitchen, which is set to air Sept. 23 on Fox TV. The always sharp-tongued Gordon Ramsay will return, as well as maître d’ Marino Monferrato and blue team sous chef Aaron Mitrano.

Season 16 includes 18 contestants, who will continuously be showered with challenges. This cooking show is ranked in the top 5 prime time shows on television.

Ramsay is popular among viewers as a riotous, passionate and supremely talented judge, full of harsh remarks for contestants.

Renowned Le Bernardin Chef Eric Ripert recently criticized Ramsay’s attitude and style, telling ABC News’ Dan Harris that chefs should not be humiliated and screamed at on TV. The popular Top Chef guest judge believes that as a chef, one should be patient and keep calm even in the most strenuous and exhausting environments.

Ripert admitted, “It’s challenging because a kitchen is not an environment that is easy. It’s very humid, it’s very hot, it’s very tight, there are a lot of sharp objects. It’s a lot of action it’s a lot of stress. Sometimes the kitchen is designed to challenge you to stay calm.”

The new season of Hell’s Kitchen includes numerous chefs from New York and Pennsylvania.

The names, occupations and signature dishes of all the 18 contestants are below:

Devin Simpson

He hails from Mount Pleasant, SC, and is an assistant restaurant manager.

His signature dish is Bacon-Wrapped Scallops with Parmesan Risotto.

Shaina Hayden

She is a banquet chef and comes from Long Island, NY.

Her signature dish is Salmon Wellington.

Rajeeyah Gia Young

She is a catering chef from Queens, NY.

His signature dish is Shrimp and Grits, NYC Style.

Aaron Smock

He is a cook from Traverse City, MI.

His signature dish is Pork Schnitzel with Blaukraut.

Pat Tortorello

He hails from Belleville, NJ and is a culinary instructor.

His signature dish is Pan-Seared Sea Bass with Citrus Risotto, Pistachio Fennel Frond Gremolata and Balsamic Glazed Heirloom Cherry Tomatoes.

Kimberly-Ann Ryan

This chef is from Traverse City, MI, and is an event chef.

Her signature dish is Seared Scallops with Mango Jalapeño Salsa and Spicy Toasted Rice Crispies.

Paulie Giganti

He is another event chef who hails from Brooklyn, NY.

His signature dish is Biscotti-Encrusted Scallops over a Crispy Polenta with a Basil Curry Cream Sauce.

Heidi Parent

She is an executive chef from Auburn, ME.

Her signature dish is Ricotta Gnocchi.

Jessica Boynton

She is the university chef and hails from Raleigh, NC.

Her signature dish is Risotto and Bacon-Wrapped Chicken.

Kimberly Roth

She comes from Rochester, NY, and is a Sushi Chef.

Her signature dish is Pappardelle with Clams.

Heather Williams

She is from Easton, PA, and is a Sous Chef.

Her signature dish is Dry-Aged Ribeye with Hasselback Potato and Roasted Brussel Sprouts.

Genaro Delillo

He is a sous chef and comes from Lebanon, PA.

His signature dish is Seared Duck Breast.

Andrew Pearce

He is a sous chef from Prospect Park, PA.

His signature dish is Pan-Roasted Halibut with Butter-Poached Leaks, Maitake Mushrooms and Shell Fish Broth


Zesty Citrus Fruits Brighten Winter Meals

This is the season of citrus, and just about every corner of the U.S. has grapefruits, limes, lemons, tangerines and oranges in produce bins at farmers markets and grocery stores. The versatility of the different varieties makes it easy to include them in your daily diet in exciting and delicious ways. One of the best is to add the peeled, segmented fruit to salads or recipes.

How to segment a citrus fruit

Using a sharp knife, cut off the top and bottom of the fruit so it stands flat and stable on the cutting board. Carefully cut the skin off the flesh from top to bottom, rotating the fruit as you go, until all the skin and white pith is off the flesh. Then cut each segment from the membrane. Work over a bowl to catch all the juice for use in dressings, cocktails, smoothies or just to drink.

Oranges and tangerines

Oranges and tangerines -- with names like navel, Cara Cara, clementine and Satsuma -- may be the most popular citrus fruits. For eating out of hand or squeezing for juice, these sweet, tasty citrus have no match.

Try them peeled in a smoothie for breakfast I like to use three oranges or tangerines, a banana and a good handful of spinach, which dyes the smoothie emerald green.

Zest the skin and add a tablespoon to your favorite chocolate chip cookie recipe for a zingy blast -- there is nothing like the combo of chocolate with orange.

Add segments to raw spinach and thinly sliced red onion for a tangy salad. Toss with a quick dressing of rice vinegar, honey, a dash of sesame oil and olive oil, then top with a sprinkle of sesame seeds.

Limes are one of nature's seasonings and are absolute necessities for a well-stocked bar, in Southeast Asian cooking and as part of a gutsy margarita.

Add the juice to avocados, cilantro, salt and garlic for a creamy bowl of guacamole.

Stir coconut milk and lime juice with a good curry paste (I like Sukhi's or Patak's) then simmer briefly to make a sauce. Add cooked chicken, sliced fresh mango or peeled pears, peas and chopped sautéed onion for a quick chicken curry. Serve with steamed basmati rice and naan.

Make a marinade using the juice and zest of one lime with soy sauce, minced garlic, minced jalapeno and a drop or two of honey. Use on mild white fish, chicken, shrimp or skirt or flank steak cooked on the grill.

These somewhat unwieldy fruits are too large to take in a lunch box, require a knife to cut or peel and have a surprisingly tart/sweet flavor, but what would winter be without this juicy fruit? In salads, dressings, juices, sodas and cocktails, both pink and yellow grapefruit add a tart/sweet smack of flavor. My favorite varieties are Oro Blanco and Melo Gold.

To make a healthy winter salad, mix segments of grapefruit and slices of ripe avocado with a mix of arugula and spinach, shavings of fennel and a sprinkle of toasted pumpkin seeds over the top. Make a dressing with the grapefruit juice saved from segmenting, balsamic vinegar, a drizzle of honey and olive oil.

For a quick snack, cut a grapefruit into medium-size wedges and eat, pulling the sections off the skin. Stand over the sink or the juice will dribble down your front.

For a warming winter cocktail, shake vodka and ice with grapefruit and lime juices in a cocktail shaker. Strain into glasses and fill with pomegranate soda. Add a couple of cubes of ice and enjoy.

Lemons are the most versatile of citrus fruits, used year-round and the world over. For squeezing on fish, adding the juice to marinades, dressings, curd, iced tea and cocktails, or zesting the skin into gremolata, baked goods and even pasta, every part of the lemon can be put to good use.

For a salad dressing that can be your go-to, whisk the juice of half a lemon, chopped garlic to taste, a dab of Dijon mustard, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil to form an emulsion.

Pile the zest of one lemon, a handful of parsley, 1/2 teaspoon of fresh rosemary needles, 1 large clove garlic and salt and pepper on a cutting board. Finely chop all ingredients together into a paste. Mix with a little olive oil and spread on halibut, albacore tuna, chicken or pork then grill over coals or sear in a hot pan, lower heat and cook to desired doneness. It's a heavenly smell!

Combine lemon juice, a pinch of zest, honey and a knob of peeled fresh ginger in a teacup. Fill with boiling water and steep 2 minutes then sip for cough and cold relief.

Tools for citrus fruits

Pictured are must-have tools for working with citrus fruits. A handled microplane grater is perfect for zesting citrus quickly and easily. Before microplanes were born, we had the most pathetic zesting tools, now this guy makes it painless.

A small wooden reamer is what I use to juice limes and lemons, it squeezes out every drop. The large juicing reamer is good for any citrus fruit and traps the seeds as well. It also snaps onto measuring cups or bowls for easy catchment of juice.


Chatelaine's Modern Classics : The Very Best from the Chatelaine Kitchen: 250 Fast, Fresh, Flavourful Recipes

From Chatelaine's test kitchen to yours comes a cookbook for the way we cook today. Packed with 250 delicious, easy-to-make recipes from Canada's leading women's magazine, Chatelaine's Modern Classics is filled with tried and tested recipes for your favourite dishes. From the salty crunch of Pistachio Crusted Salmon to the sweet decadence of Cheesecake Brownies, this book has a recipe for every night and every occasion.

  • Starting with brunch all the way through to dessert, each recipe has been tested and tasted until it's just right, so you can rely on it to work in your own kitchen every time, on time
  • Includes money-saving shopping tips, time-saving menu plans, delicious drink idea, and much more
  • More than just a cookbook, Modern Classics features important health and cooking advice for busy Canadian women

From the trusted experts at Chatelaine comes a gorgeous compendium of scrumptious recipes you'll find yourself turning to time and time again.


Watch the video: Sauteed Yuzu Halibut with Bok Choy. On The Table Ep. 12 Recipe. Reserve Channel (August 2022).