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Nicolas Sarkozy Gives Up Cheese, Opts for Healthy Diet

Nicolas Sarkozy Gives Up Cheese, Opts for Healthy Diet



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The French president keeps up a healthy regime; 'Sacrebleu,' the French say

In a country known for its cheese, who can honestly give up the stuff? Apparently, French president Nicolas Sarkozy can — the leader of the fromage-loving nation is abstaining from cheese, meat, and wine to keep up a healthy regime.

Of course, his food choices are now one of the many critiques of his character as the French election season comes to an end. Sarkozy banned the after-meal cheese course from the Élysée Palace (the presidential residence), says the Agence France-Presse. The presidential chef, Bernard Vaussion, says that the health-concious leader personally OK's the day's menu each morning, and tries to eat lighter fare rather than a cheese-and-meat diet. Sarkozy also reportedly stays away from wine, which has spurred outrage from his citizens. One possible reason behind the strict diet — his supermodel wife, Carla Bruni.

But maybe he's throwing the rules out the window as he tries to win the election; the Telegraph reports on his trips to a cheese factory, meet-and-greets with chocolatiers and sausage makers, and a fondue lunch with supporters. Hey, even we stress-eat under a lot of pressure.


Step 3: The Cancer Diet

Yes, food can contribute to cancer. In fact, processed foods – those high in sugar and low in fiber and nutrients – have been linked to higher cancer risk.

But there are healthy options (that taste good, too). We'll dive into some of the science behind different diets, including plant-based. But the basics are simple: A diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains trumps processed foods.

However, keep in mind that most research only points to associations between diet and cancer, and not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship.

Foods high in antioxidants Protects cells from damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, Vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances. – dark chocolate, pecans, blueberries, strawberries, kale, and red cabbage, for example – offer other benefits, like improved cardiovascular health.

Because you have cancer does not mean you have to give up taste! A tweak here, a change there – you can do it. Ultimately, finding what works for you is the best cancer diet.

You are what you eat. It was true before Christ and remains anno Domini. And today, it could be the difference between preventing cancer and life-threatening diagnosis. Cancer diets are wide-ranging and, like any diet, success depends on you. We will showcase a list of foods for cancer patients to eat as well as cancer diet recipes. We also will spotlight which foods not to eat on a cancer diet.

Ultimately, a cancer diet plan should be a decision reached between you and a qualified health care professional. This guide is a broad overview of food and cancer.

“Cancer is not an inevitable consequence of life.”

Dr. Ernst Ludwig Wynder


Step 3: The Cancer Diet

Yes, food can contribute to cancer. In fact, processed foods – those high in sugar and low in fiber and nutrients – have been linked to higher cancer risk.

But there are healthy options (that taste good, too). We'll dive into some of the science behind different diets, including plant-based. But the basics are simple: A diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains trumps processed foods.

However, keep in mind that most research only points to associations between diet and cancer, and not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship.

Foods high in antioxidants Protects cells from damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, Vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances. – dark chocolate, pecans, blueberries, strawberries, kale, and red cabbage, for example – offer other benefits, like improved cardiovascular health.

Because you have cancer does not mean you have to give up taste! A tweak here, a change there – you can do it. Ultimately, finding what works for you is the best cancer diet.

You are what you eat. It was true before Christ and remains anno Domini. And today, it could be the difference between preventing cancer and life-threatening diagnosis. Cancer diets are wide-ranging and, like any diet, success depends on you. We will showcase a list of foods for cancer patients to eat as well as cancer diet recipes. We also will spotlight which foods not to eat on a cancer diet.

Ultimately, a cancer diet plan should be a decision reached between you and a qualified health care professional. This guide is a broad overview of food and cancer.

“Cancer is not an inevitable consequence of life.”

Dr. Ernst Ludwig Wynder


Step 3: The Cancer Diet

Yes, food can contribute to cancer. In fact, processed foods – those high in sugar and low in fiber and nutrients – have been linked to higher cancer risk.

But there are healthy options (that taste good, too). We'll dive into some of the science behind different diets, including plant-based. But the basics are simple: A diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains trumps processed foods.

However, keep in mind that most research only points to associations between diet and cancer, and not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship.

Foods high in antioxidants Protects cells from damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, Vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances. – dark chocolate, pecans, blueberries, strawberries, kale, and red cabbage, for example – offer other benefits, like improved cardiovascular health.

Because you have cancer does not mean you have to give up taste! A tweak here, a change there – you can do it. Ultimately, finding what works for you is the best cancer diet.

You are what you eat. It was true before Christ and remains anno Domini. And today, it could be the difference between preventing cancer and life-threatening diagnosis. Cancer diets are wide-ranging and, like any diet, success depends on you. We will showcase a list of foods for cancer patients to eat as well as cancer diet recipes. We also will spotlight which foods not to eat on a cancer diet.

Ultimately, a cancer diet plan should be a decision reached between you and a qualified health care professional. This guide is a broad overview of food and cancer.

“Cancer is not an inevitable consequence of life.”

Dr. Ernst Ludwig Wynder


Step 3: The Cancer Diet

Yes, food can contribute to cancer. In fact, processed foods – those high in sugar and low in fiber and nutrients – have been linked to higher cancer risk.

But there are healthy options (that taste good, too). We'll dive into some of the science behind different diets, including plant-based. But the basics are simple: A diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains trumps processed foods.

However, keep in mind that most research only points to associations between diet and cancer, and not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship.

Foods high in antioxidants Protects cells from damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, Vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances. – dark chocolate, pecans, blueberries, strawberries, kale, and red cabbage, for example – offer other benefits, like improved cardiovascular health.

Because you have cancer does not mean you have to give up taste! A tweak here, a change there – you can do it. Ultimately, finding what works for you is the best cancer diet.

You are what you eat. It was true before Christ and remains anno Domini. And today, it could be the difference between preventing cancer and life-threatening diagnosis. Cancer diets are wide-ranging and, like any diet, success depends on you. We will showcase a list of foods for cancer patients to eat as well as cancer diet recipes. We also will spotlight which foods not to eat on a cancer diet.

Ultimately, a cancer diet plan should be a decision reached between you and a qualified health care professional. This guide is a broad overview of food and cancer.

“Cancer is not an inevitable consequence of life.”

Dr. Ernst Ludwig Wynder


Step 3: The Cancer Diet

Yes, food can contribute to cancer. In fact, processed foods – those high in sugar and low in fiber and nutrients – have been linked to higher cancer risk.

But there are healthy options (that taste good, too). We'll dive into some of the science behind different diets, including plant-based. But the basics are simple: A diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains trumps processed foods.

However, keep in mind that most research only points to associations between diet and cancer, and not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship.

Foods high in antioxidants Protects cells from damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, Vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances. – dark chocolate, pecans, blueberries, strawberries, kale, and red cabbage, for example – offer other benefits, like improved cardiovascular health.

Because you have cancer does not mean you have to give up taste! A tweak here, a change there – you can do it. Ultimately, finding what works for you is the best cancer diet.

You are what you eat. It was true before Christ and remains anno Domini. And today, it could be the difference between preventing cancer and life-threatening diagnosis. Cancer diets are wide-ranging and, like any diet, success depends on you. We will showcase a list of foods for cancer patients to eat as well as cancer diet recipes. We also will spotlight which foods not to eat on a cancer diet.

Ultimately, a cancer diet plan should be a decision reached between you and a qualified health care professional. This guide is a broad overview of food and cancer.

“Cancer is not an inevitable consequence of life.”

Dr. Ernst Ludwig Wynder


Step 3: The Cancer Diet

Yes, food can contribute to cancer. In fact, processed foods – those high in sugar and low in fiber and nutrients – have been linked to higher cancer risk.

But there are healthy options (that taste good, too). We'll dive into some of the science behind different diets, including plant-based. But the basics are simple: A diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains trumps processed foods.

However, keep in mind that most research only points to associations between diet and cancer, and not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship.

Foods high in antioxidants Protects cells from damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, Vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances. – dark chocolate, pecans, blueberries, strawberries, kale, and red cabbage, for example – offer other benefits, like improved cardiovascular health.

Because you have cancer does not mean you have to give up taste! A tweak here, a change there – you can do it. Ultimately, finding what works for you is the best cancer diet.

You are what you eat. It was true before Christ and remains anno Domini. And today, it could be the difference between preventing cancer and life-threatening diagnosis. Cancer diets are wide-ranging and, like any diet, success depends on you. We will showcase a list of foods for cancer patients to eat as well as cancer diet recipes. We also will spotlight which foods not to eat on a cancer diet.

Ultimately, a cancer diet plan should be a decision reached between you and a qualified health care professional. This guide is a broad overview of food and cancer.

“Cancer is not an inevitable consequence of life.”

Dr. Ernst Ludwig Wynder


Step 3: The Cancer Diet

Yes, food can contribute to cancer. In fact, processed foods – those high in sugar and low in fiber and nutrients – have been linked to higher cancer risk.

But there are healthy options (that taste good, too). We'll dive into some of the science behind different diets, including plant-based. But the basics are simple: A diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains trumps processed foods.

However, keep in mind that most research only points to associations between diet and cancer, and not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship.

Foods high in antioxidants Protects cells from damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, Vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances. – dark chocolate, pecans, blueberries, strawberries, kale, and red cabbage, for example – offer other benefits, like improved cardiovascular health.

Because you have cancer does not mean you have to give up taste! A tweak here, a change there – you can do it. Ultimately, finding what works for you is the best cancer diet.

You are what you eat. It was true before Christ and remains anno Domini. And today, it could be the difference between preventing cancer and life-threatening diagnosis. Cancer diets are wide-ranging and, like any diet, success depends on you. We will showcase a list of foods for cancer patients to eat as well as cancer diet recipes. We also will spotlight which foods not to eat on a cancer diet.

Ultimately, a cancer diet plan should be a decision reached between you and a qualified health care professional. This guide is a broad overview of food and cancer.

“Cancer is not an inevitable consequence of life.”

Dr. Ernst Ludwig Wynder


Step 3: The Cancer Diet

Yes, food can contribute to cancer. In fact, processed foods – those high in sugar and low in fiber and nutrients – have been linked to higher cancer risk.

But there are healthy options (that taste good, too). We'll dive into some of the science behind different diets, including plant-based. But the basics are simple: A diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains trumps processed foods.

However, keep in mind that most research only points to associations between diet and cancer, and not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship.

Foods high in antioxidants Protects cells from damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, Vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances. – dark chocolate, pecans, blueberries, strawberries, kale, and red cabbage, for example – offer other benefits, like improved cardiovascular health.

Because you have cancer does not mean you have to give up taste! A tweak here, a change there – you can do it. Ultimately, finding what works for you is the best cancer diet.

You are what you eat. It was true before Christ and remains anno Domini. And today, it could be the difference between preventing cancer and life-threatening diagnosis. Cancer diets are wide-ranging and, like any diet, success depends on you. We will showcase a list of foods for cancer patients to eat as well as cancer diet recipes. We also will spotlight which foods not to eat on a cancer diet.

Ultimately, a cancer diet plan should be a decision reached between you and a qualified health care professional. This guide is a broad overview of food and cancer.

“Cancer is not an inevitable consequence of life.”

Dr. Ernst Ludwig Wynder


Step 3: The Cancer Diet

Yes, food can contribute to cancer. In fact, processed foods – those high in sugar and low in fiber and nutrients – have been linked to higher cancer risk.

But there are healthy options (that taste good, too). We'll dive into some of the science behind different diets, including plant-based. But the basics are simple: A diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains trumps processed foods.

However, keep in mind that most research only points to associations between diet and cancer, and not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship.

Foods high in antioxidants Protects cells from damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, Vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances. – dark chocolate, pecans, blueberries, strawberries, kale, and red cabbage, for example – offer other benefits, like improved cardiovascular health.

Because you have cancer does not mean you have to give up taste! A tweak here, a change there – you can do it. Ultimately, finding what works for you is the best cancer diet.

You are what you eat. It was true before Christ and remains anno Domini. And today, it could be the difference between preventing cancer and life-threatening diagnosis. Cancer diets are wide-ranging and, like any diet, success depends on you. We will showcase a list of foods for cancer patients to eat as well as cancer diet recipes. We also will spotlight which foods not to eat on a cancer diet.

Ultimately, a cancer diet plan should be a decision reached between you and a qualified health care professional. This guide is a broad overview of food and cancer.

“Cancer is not an inevitable consequence of life.”

Dr. Ernst Ludwig Wynder


Step 3: The Cancer Diet

Yes, food can contribute to cancer. In fact, processed foods – those high in sugar and low in fiber and nutrients – have been linked to higher cancer risk.

But there are healthy options (that taste good, too). We'll dive into some of the science behind different diets, including plant-based. But the basics are simple: A diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains trumps processed foods.

However, keep in mind that most research only points to associations between diet and cancer, and not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship.

Foods high in antioxidants Protects cells from damage caused by free radicals (unstable molecules made by the process of oxidation during normal metabolism). Free radicals may play a part in cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of aging. Antioxidants include beta-carotene, lycopene, Vitamins A, C, and E, and other natural and manufactured substances. – dark chocolate, pecans, blueberries, strawberries, kale, and red cabbage, for example – offer other benefits, like improved cardiovascular health.

Because you have cancer does not mean you have to give up taste! A tweak here, a change there – you can do it. Ultimately, finding what works for you is the best cancer diet.

You are what you eat. It was true before Christ and remains anno Domini. And today, it could be the difference between preventing cancer and life-threatening diagnosis. Cancer diets are wide-ranging and, like any diet, success depends on you. We will showcase a list of foods for cancer patients to eat as well as cancer diet recipes. We also will spotlight which foods not to eat on a cancer diet.

Ultimately, a cancer diet plan should be a decision reached between you and a qualified health care professional. This guide is a broad overview of food and cancer.

“Cancer is not an inevitable consequence of life.”

Dr. Ernst Ludwig Wynder


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